Johnson & Johnson vaccine could be two doses: White House adviser

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Johnson & Johnson vaccine could be two doses: White House adviser

Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine could end up being a two-dose regimen if it proves to offer more protection than one, a Whi

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Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine could end up being a two-dose regimen if it proves to offer more protection than one, a White House adviser said Thursday.

“Johnson & Johnson is currently evaluating how their vaccine performs with two doses — in other words their own booster,” Andy Slavitt, a senior adviser to the COVID-19 response team, said in an interview on Washington Post Live.

“Pending the results of that, pending what the FDA has to say if the vaccine is approved in the first place, there may be a second shot of Johnson & Johnson.”

The drugmaker announced a large-scale trial to test the two-dose regimen in November.

The company said it planned to enroll as many as 60,000 participants worldwide for the study, which was run parallel with a one-dose trial.

The participants are given either either a placebo or the experimental shot, currently called Ad26COV2, followed by a second dose or placebo 57 days later.

“The study will assess efficacy of the investigational vaccine after both the first and second dose to evaluate protection against the virus and potential incremental benefits for duration of protection with a second dose,” J&J said in a statement.

A healthcare worker holds vials containing doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine
A healthcare worker holds vials containing doses of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine
Phil Magakoe/Getty Images

The company has already filed for emergency authorization of its one-dose COVID-19 vaccine, which has shown to be 66 percent effective against moderate to severe cases.

If it is approved by the Food and Drug Administration, it will have to go head-to-head with two-dose rivals Pfizer and Moderna, both of which offer more than 90 percent efficacy.

With Post Wires

 



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