Dental health: The snacks which 'actually help to keep your teeth clean and healthy'

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The NHS says: “Have a healthy lifestyle, including eating well, not smoking and limiting your alcohol and sugar intake. It’s good for your whole body, including your teeth, gums and mouth.” The health body suggests people floss or use an interdental brush every day to remove food, debris and plaque lodged between your teeth.

Dr Khaled Kasem, Chief Orthodontist at Impress said some foods are essential to maintain good oral health.

He said: “A firm favourite for snacking, chocolate actually helps to fight tooth decay because its grain contains strong antibacterial agents.

“That doesn’t mean you should eat chocolate in excess, though, but a small amount is enough to keep the decay at bay.””

He added: “It’s a well-known fact that dairy products are a rich source of calcium and Vitamin D, which not only strengthens teeth, but it also whitens their enamel, too.”

Dr Khaled Kasem, Chief Orthodontist at Impress said some foods are essential to maintain good oral health.

He said: “A firm favourite for snacking, chocolate actually helps to fight tooth decay because its grain contains strong antibacterial agents.

“That doesn’t mean you should eat chocolate in excess, though, but a small amount is enough to keep the decay at bay.””

He added: “It’s a well-known fact that dairy products are a rich source of calcium and Vitamin D, which not only strengthens teeth, but it also whitens their enamel, too.”

There are also some berries and fruits which are well known for their health properties, such as strawberries, apples and blueberries. These may also be good snacks for your teeth.

Dr Khaled said: “The sweetest fruit of them all, strawberries contain a high amount of xylitol, which is responsible for attacking the bacteria that cause dental plaque.”

He said: “An apple a day keeps the dentist away… okay that might not be the official saying, but because they are hard and crunchy, eating an apple is one of the best fruits for your teeth.

“The more you chew, the more saliva you produce, which serves as a protector of the teeth, in addition to eliminating dental plaque.”

The Oral Health Foundation said: “It takes up to an hour for your mouth to cancel out the acid caused by eating and drinking sugar.

“During this time your teeth are under attack from this acid. It is therefore important to limit the number of attacks by having sugary foods and drinks just at mealtimes.”

The American Dental Association (ADA) says: “Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing—the first steps in the digestion process.

Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth.



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