Addison Rae ridiculed for dropping face mist designed to protect skin from screens blue light

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TikTok star Addison Rae is being ridiculed on social media for releasing a face mist that purports to protect skin from the blue light emitted from screens – just a few months after another influencer had to cancel similar products due to backlash.

ITEM Beauty By Addison Rae says its Screen Break Blue Light + Anti Pollution Protection Mist was designed to guard and relieve the skin from the blue light that comes from cell phones, computers, and TVs. 

But while the 21-year-old has amassed an incredible 86.6 million TikTok followers, Twitter user are not quite so impressed by the product launch.

Many have been quick to point out that another influencer, streamer Valkyrae, debuted something similar last year – and almost immediately had to pull it after critics called it a ‘scam,’ insisting that there is limited evidence that blue light is even harmful to skin in the first place.

Now social media users are lobbing the same criticism at Addison, accusing her of ‘lying’ to fans and somehow missing the memo from Valkyrae’s scandal just months earlier. 

Addison Rae is being for releasing a face mist that purports to protect skin from the blue light emitted from screens - just months after another influencer had to cancel the same product due to backlash

Addison Rae is being for releasing a face mist that purports to protect skin from the blue light emitted from screens – just months after another influencer had to cancel the same product due to backlash

In October 2021, streamer Valkyrae (pictured) started her own skincare line called RFLCT, and it sold almost the exact same item

Now, Addison (pictured) is selling the beauty product

In October 2021, streamer Valkyrae (left) started her own skincare line called RFLCT, and it sold almost the exact same item. Now, Addison (right) is selling the beauty product

The new face mist was supposedly designed to protect and relieve the skin from the blue light that comes from screens on cell phones, computers, and TVs

The new face mist was supposedly designed to protect and relieve the skin from the blue light that comes from screens on cell phones, computers, and TVs

In October 2021, Valkyrae – real name Rachell Hofstetter – announced that she had started her own beauty line called RFLCT in collaboration with Ideavation Labs.

The line included several products with something called pro BLPR, a ‘blue light protection factor.’ It was advertised to work like SPF, but instead of protecting against the sun, the brand claimed it protected ‘protects against blue light pollution’ from screens. 

At the time, there was swift backlash against Valkyrae’s product, with some calling it a ‘scam’ – since it has yet to be proven that the blue light that comes from screens is even bad for your skin.  

Two weeks after its launch, RFLCT was taken down all together, with a note on its website reading, ‘While we believe in the formulations created, after further reflection, have decided to move forward on new paths, effectively terminating the RFLCT brand.’

Yet Addison appears to have missed the memo, and has just released her own blue light protectant, which is described as a ‘hydrating mist clinically shown to protect skin from artificial HEV blue light and daily pollution’ on Sephora’s website.

It costs $20 and ingredients include ashwagandha root, niacinamide, and dandelion extract.

‘This refreshing formula relieves screen-fatigued skin with a shielding boost of hydration,’ a description reads.

‘It’s packed with a botanical blend to protect skin from screen-emitted HEV blue light damage and everyday pollutants. 

However, many people are slamming Addison's product, with some even calling it a 'scam', because it has yet to be proven that the blue light emitted from screens is bad for your skin

However, many people are slamming Addison’s product, with some even calling it a ‘scam’, because it has yet to be proven that the blue light emitted from screens is bad for your skin

The face mist is described as a 'hydrating mist clinically shown to protect skin from HEV blue light.' Ingredients include ashwagandha root, niacinamide, and dandelion extract

The face mist is described as a ‘hydrating mist clinically shown to protect skin from HEV blue light.’ Ingredients include ashwagandha root, niacinamide, and dandelion extract

'This refreshing formula relieves screen-fatigued skin,' a description reads. 'It’s packed with a botanical blend to protect skin from screen-emitted HEV blue light damage'

'This refreshing formula relieves screen-fatigued skin,' a description reads. 'It’s packed with a botanical blend to protect skin from screen-emitted HEV blue light damage'

‘This refreshing formula relieves screen-fatigued skin,’ a description reads. ‘It’s packed with a botanical blend to protect skin from screen-emitted HEV blue light damage’

‘Keep it with you throughout the day and spray anytime you need a screen break.’

In the wake of Addison’s announcement, many people took to Twitter to put her on blast, with some pointing out the lack of evidence surrounding the dangers of blue light, and others calling out the similarities between her and Valkyrae’s products.

‘Ah s**t, here we go again,’ one person wrote. ‘Addison, you and your management team are in so much trouble.

‘The product is probably good for your skin, I’m not knocking it, besides the fact that the main feature is nothing more than a scare-crow. Blue light doesn’t damage your skin.’

Another added: ‘Wow… Addison Rae (@whoisaddison) is literally bald face lying and trying to rip her audience off. I really hope she doesn’t get away this BS.’   

‘Throwing another Rae under the bus with this scam product LMAO,’ said someone else.

A fourth tweet read: ‘Is anyone gonna tell her this didn’t go well the first time?’  

‘There is currently no evidence that blue light is harmful for skin. Why is this product needed?’ a different user asked.

‘How did she miss the Valkyrae backlash?’ quipped another. ‘Addison Rae didn’t even Google blue light skin care when being asked to promote it? Wtf. How does your team let this get through?’ 

‘That’s odd. That’s suspicious and oddly familiar lol,’ another disgruntled person wrote. 

‘This company needs to stop scamming people! Unless they got their studies to back it up. I need the receipts!’

When Valkyrae saw Addison’s new product, she couldn’t help but share her dismay to Twitter.

‘I’m re-branding to just Valky,’ she joked. ‘How is this real? I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s the same company.’ 

Twitter users blasted Addison, with some pointing out the lack of evidence for the dangers of blue light, and others calling out the similarities between her and Valkyrae's products

Twitter users blasted Addison, with some pointing out the lack of evidence for the dangers of blue light, and others calling out the similarities between her and Valkyrae’s products

The effects of blue light on the body have been debated among professionals.

According to Dr. Adam Mamelak, over-exposure to blue light can cause eye strain and vision problems, but it does not cause harm to the skin.

‘It can also affect circadian rhythms and potentially disrupt sleep patterns,’ he told Insider.

‘This is why many don’t recommend looking at screens late at night or while in bed.’

Medicine Net reported, ‘Blue light has actually been used in the past to treat many skin conditions, such as acne, sun-induced skin damage, psoriasis, actinic keratosis.’ 

A May 2021 study by Beiersdorf research team also stated, ‘Through our research activities, we’ve managed to prove that the amount of artificial blue light emitted during conventional use of electronic devices is nowhere near enough to trigger harmful skin effects.’

However, dermatologist Dr Stefanie Williams told Harpers Bazaar, ‘We are now seeing increasing data on the potential long-term harms of visible light, and in particular blue light, on our skin. Blue light can penetrate all the way to our dermis, where our collagen and elastin live.’ 

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